We will not be shipping to the following states until the weather breaks in the fall: CA, WA, OR, AZ, NV, UT, CO, NM, WY, ID, AK.

Ginkgo biloba
Ginkgo biloba
Ginkgo biloba

Ginkgo biloba

Regular price $20.00 Sale

Ginkgo. Very little can be added to what has been written about this "wonder" tree. There are even fossils of its leaves which have been found in America. Does this mean that we can call it a native?! Planted mostly for its brilliant golden yellow fall color, this plant is unique in that it is a Gymnosperm, since Ginkgo seeds are not protected by an ovary wall, making it a closer relative of conifers than broadleaf trees. The Ginkgo is classified in its own division, the Ginkgophyta, comprising the single class Ginkgoopsida, order Ginkgoales, family Ginkgoaceae, genus Ginkgo and is the only extant species within this group. The leaves have a characteristic "fan" shape resembling the small leaflets of a Maidenhair Fern, hence the often used common name of "Maidenhair Tree." Of course the plant is dioecious, with separate male and female trees. The caution here is that females produce a "fruit" or berry of up to 1 1/2" of a bluish gray color. But upon dropping in the fall, the berries cover the ground with what is often referred to as overly malodorous smell. It doesn't bother me that much because of sinus problems from my youth, I can scarcely smell. But the more fastidious among us tend to turn up their noses. In the Orient, the seed are considered a delicacy. I have eaten them in Japan and would compare them to eating the edible soybeans, Edamame, which I adore. One of my most memorable experiences in Japan was when we stopped to admire a small orchard of Ginkgo planted for their fruit. The old gentlemen farmer to which the planting belonged took us on a circuitous route over rice patties to his home where he showed us how he processed the fruit by removing the pulp. He got a very handsome price for his efforts. A box smaller than the size of a cigar box was $10.00. When I noticed that every tree in his orchard were females, I got our fellow Japanese nurseryman to ask him how many males did he have to plant to pollinate his females. His response was that as long as there was a male tree within 2-3 kilometers of his orchard (this would be 1.5 to 2 miles),it would solve his pollination requirements. And since male trees were planted as street trees almost all over Japan, he didn't have anything to worry about. Pollination is from wind borne pollen and not from insects. Plants offered here are seedlings, so we can't guarantee their sex, so buyer beware. If you think there are no Ginkgo trees within 2-3 miles of your garden, then you are safe!!! Most grafted plants sold in America are males, but I have brought several female cultivars back from Japan that are grown for their fruit. Maybe in the future we will offer some of these.